Annual E. E. Just Lecture

Each year, UChicago Biosciences invites a distinguished member of a group underrepresented in science to deliver a lecture to honor the legacy of E.E. Just, PhD 1916.

Just pursued a PhD in zoology at the University of Chicago in absentia from 1911-1916. He worked most summers with UChicago professor and later Dean of the Biological Sciences Frank Lillie and others at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA, and maintained his position at Howard University for the rest of the year. Just discovered an important aspect of cell cleavage while researching his dissertation and published his most important work, The Biology of the Cell Surface, in 1939.

Upcoming Events

2017:

Heather Pinkett, PhD

Heather Pinkett received her PhD at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 2004 and then continued her research training as a postdoc at Caltech. She joined the faculty at Northwestern University in the Department of Molecular Biosciences in 2008. The Pinkett Lab is interested in how nutrients, antibiotics and chemotherapeutics are transported into or out of the cell.  Their focus is on ABC transporters, proteins that use ATP hydrolysis to shuttle substrates across cellular membranes.

Previous E. E. Just Lecturers

2016:

Malcolm Byrnes, PhD 

Howard University Professor Malcolm Byrnes spoke about the life and research of E. E. Just, whom he has studied extensively. The talk, entitled "E.E. Just's Broad (and Hidden) Influence on the Development of Modern Biology,” celebrated the 100th anniversary of Just receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. 

Yasmin Hurd, PhD

Mount Sinai Professor Yasmin Hurd has done extensive research on the neurobiology of addiction within developing brains. Her most recent research has focused specifically on the effect marijuana has on teenagers, and the likelihood that a teen who uses cannabis regularly will be more prone to developing other addictive tendencies.

2015: Tyrone Hayes, PhD

Professor Tyrone Hayes of the University of California, Berkeley has dedicated his life to researching the effect of steroids on amphibian development. These investigations have covered everything from metamorphosis to sex differentiation and behavior regulation. His talk, entitled, “From Silent Spring to Silent Night: A Tale of Toads and Men,” gave students a brief overview of his work so far, and discussed the political implications of his findings on the chemical atrazine.

2014: Rhonda Dzakpasu, PhD

Georgetown Professor Rhonda Dzakpasu is an expert in experimental optical physics and neuroscience. Her most recent research involved the study of how neural networks will work in tandem, executing synchronized activity.

2013: Cassandra Extavour, PhD

Cassandra Extavour is Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University. Her lecture was entitled "Evolutionary novelty in genes and developmental pathways: lessons from germ cells."

2012: Paul Magwene, PhD

Paul Magwene, PhD'99 (Committee on Evolutionary Biology), is Associate Professor of Biology at Duke University.

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